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Monday, April 27
 

7:30am

Morning Beverages
Attendees staying within the SATURN hotel-room block receive a voucher good for breakfast each day of their stay in the hotel restaurant.

Monday April 27, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
6. Refreshment Area

7:30am

8:30am

Big Data: Architectures and Technologies
Scalable big-data systems are significant long-term investments that must scale to handle ever-increasing data volumes, and therefore represent high-risk applications in which the software and data architectures are fundamental components of ensuring success. This one-day course is designed for architects and technical stakeholders such as product managers, development managers, and systems engineers involved in the development of big data applications. It focuses on the relationship among application software, data models, and deployment architectures, and how specific technology selection relates to all of these. While we touch briefly on data analytics, the course focuses on the distributed data storage and access infrastructure, and the architecture tradeoffs needed to achieve scalability, consistency, availability, and performance. We illustrate these architecture principles with examples from selected NoSQL product implementations.

Learn more about the Big Data: Architectures and Technologies course.

Course Instructors
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line architecture... Read More →


Monday April 27, 2015 8:30am - 5:00pm
5. Salon B

8:30am

DevOps and Continuous Delivery: Software Architecture, Security, and Interactive Learning
This one-day course is designed for architects and technical stakeholders such as product managers, development managers, and systems engineers who are interested in adopting DevOps practices and continuous-delivery workflows. The architecture component of the course focuses on the relationships among application software, the deployment environment, and the supporting tooling. The instructors will explore key qualities, tradeoffs, and techniques for architecting across these dimensions and provide guidance for security processes and test automation compatible with DevOps practices. Attendees will gain experience with a reasoning model that outlines various types of security automation tests to consider as well as recommendations for dealing with security processes that can’t be automated. Interactive learning exercises will provide food for thought for both newcomers to continuous integration and automatic provisioning and those who want to hone their skills.

Course Instructors
avatar for Stephany Bellomo

Stephany Bellomo

Stephany Bellomo is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). She teaches SEI courses in Service-Oriented Architecture Migration of Legacy Components and Software Architecture Principles and Practices. Bellomo is a member of the organizing committee for the International Workshop on Release Engineering 2014, hosted by Google, and a member of the editorial committee for an issue of IEEE... Read More →
avatar for Aaron Cois

Aaron Cois

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Aaron Cois received his MS and PhD from the University of Pittsburgh for work developing novel systems and algorithms for medical image analysis. His research involved developing frameworks, algorithms, and data structures to efficiently perform complex statistical calculations on large amounts of data. His background in machine learning and complex systems led him toward developing features and systems for data- and analysis-driven... Read More →


Monday April 27, 2015 8:30am - 5:00pm
3. Salon E

8:30am

Managing Technical Debt in Software Systems
Technical debt occurs when a design or construction approach is taken that's expedient in the short term, but increases complexity and cost in the long term. Whether it results from ignorance, accident, or strategy, all software-reliant systems carry some technical debt. If managed well, some technical debt can accelerate design exploration. Left unrecognized and unmanaged, accumulated technical debt results in increased development and sustainment costs. This course is designed for professionals who develop and maintain software-reliant systems to gain a better understanding of
  • how technical debt manifests in software
  • what developers, architects, and managers need to know about technical debt
  • how to manage technical debt effectively  
This one-day course emphasizes the importance of intentional and strategic management of technical debt that is supported by architecture-focused practices.

Course Instructors
avatar for Robert Nord

Robert Nord

Robert Nord is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI), where he develops effective methods and practices for software architecture. He also leads research on strategies for scaling agile development by incorporating architecture practices. Before joining the SEI, he worked in industry, where he balanced research in software architecture with work in designing and evaluating large-scale... Read More →
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics, and agile development. Her recent research focuses on managing technical debt in large-scale, software-intensive... Read More →


Monday April 27, 2015 8:30am - 5:00pm
2. Salon D

8:30am

Microservices Workshop
In this microservices workshop, we will explore  various facets of microservices architecture of interest to participants. The abstract and workshop agenda are hosted on GitHub, and we plan to publish outcomes of the workshop there as well.

Moderators
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →

Monday April 27, 2015 8:30am - 5:00pm
Salon A

10:00am

12:00pm

Lunch
Monday April 27, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
6. Refreshment Area

2:30pm

7:00pm

DC Software Process Improvement Network (SPIN) Meeting
The DC SPIN will meet in conjunction with SATURN 2015. All SATURN registrants are welcome to attend the meeting.

Amine Chigani of GE Global Research will speak on the topic of "Maturing Agile Teams and Driving Quality Through Architecture Principles." The architect’s effectiveness to drive sound architectural decisions and reconcile tradeoffs that positively impact the quality of software solutions can be inhibited when development teams are immature and appropriate quality assurance process and tools are lacking. Teams that must adapt their agile software engineering approach to fit non-agile organizational structures and business contexts find this challenge particularly apparent.

This experience report shares insights and lessons learned from a yearlong effort to work with newly formed agile teams to standardize on quality assurance practices and tools across projects for a customer who is new to agile development. It presents a set of process, skill set, and infrastructure changes driven by architecture quality attributes that enabled our teams to become more productive and more effective in engaging with the customer. While challenges remain, our teams today are better equipped not only to map quality attributes such as performance and integrate-ability to specific development activities but also to manage and measure these attributes.

In presenting these lessons learned, we structure the talk into three sections. First, we briefly describe our business context and development environment for teams working directly on several customer solutions. We then provide details of the quality initiative that introduced new quality practices, infrastructure, and development skills to the teams, while highlighting several of the challenges we faced. Finally, we share insights and tactics, from an architect’s perspective, that can help with these challenges, particularly the ones related to agile, architecture, and driving quality attributes for a non-agile customer.

Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Software
Amine Chigani is an Industrial Internet architect at GE Software. His work focuses on building Predictivity™ solutions for Industrial Internet domains including aviation, transportation, energy, and health care. Amine is a founding member and contributor in the Industrial Internet Consortium's architecture working group. Prior to his current assignment, Amine was an architecture scientist at GE Global Research, a visiting scientist at the... Read More →

Monday April 27, 2015 7:00pm - 9:00pm
3. Salon E
 
Tuesday, April 28
 

7:30am

8:00am

Morning Beverages
Attendees staying within the SATURN hotel-room block receive a voucher good for breakfast each day of their stay in the hotel restaurant.

Tuesday April 28, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
6. Refreshment Area

8:45am

9:00am

Keynote: Progress Toward an Engineering Discipline of Software
Is “software engineering” really engineering? The term was coined in 1968 to call attention to problems with software production. Both theory and practice for software have evolved since then, but do we yet have a true engineering discipline? Classical engineering disciplines have emerged from craft practice and commercialization through the infusion of codified knowledge and science. Using this emergence pattern as a point of reference, I will sketch the evolution of software engineering, drawing on civil engineering and software architecture for examples that show the progressive codification of informal knowledge toward rigorous models and tools. This will provide the basis for assessing the maturity of the field and identifying our next challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Shaw

Mary Shaw

Carnegie Mellon University
Mary Shaw is the Alan J. Perlis University Professor of Computer Science in the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1972. For pioneering leadership in the development of innovative curricula in Computer Science, Dr. Shaw received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Barack Obama during a White House ceremony in November 2014. The medal is the... Read More →



Tuesday April 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
4. Salon C: General Sessions

10:00am

Morning Break
Tuesday April 28, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
6. Refreshment Area

10:30am

Injection, Modularity, and Testing: An Architecturally Interesting Intersection
Dependency injection, code modularity, and testing often seem like staid, even boring, topics, but there are surprises when you put all three together. Seemingly independent decisions about each influence the others. Making rational development decisions each day can still lead you into a thicket of complexity and loss of maintainability. So when should you give it your “architectural attention”? This talk discusses the problem and suggests some limited solutions.

Presenters
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.

Tuesday April 28, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
3. Salon E

10:30am

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Software Architecture 101
Designed to provide developers with essential introductory information about software architecture

Presenters
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line architecture... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
5. Salon B

10:30am

Maximize Your Business Impact as an Architect
How can architects be most effective? What concerns and decisions should they focus on? And what should they postpone or leave to designers and coders? Practicing architects are often under pressure from stakeholders such as project and program managers and product owners to address the “concern of the day” or to finish deliverables according to fixed schedules and rigid methodologies. Blindly giving in to such pressure leaves key risks unaddressed and delays high-impact decisions, which threaten project success and product quality.

In this participatory session, we will discuss and exercise key principles for architects to prioritize architectural concerns based on economic aspects:
  • how to prioritize architectural concerns and decisions based on objective, economic arguments
  • how to justify your priorities to business stakeholders and increase your business impact
  • how to prevent high-impact architectural concerns from remaining unaddressed due to schedule pressure

The principles can be applied in both agile (Scrum, SAFe) and more conventional settings. They help architects not only to maximize their economic impact by identifying the most important concerns and decisions to spend time and energy on but also to explain the rationale behind their priorities to stakeholders in business terms.
The session is based on Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA), an approach that has been developed by CGI and has proven to support architects globally in a lean and agile manner. RCDA’s practices help architects create “just-enough architecture” in tight time frames. RCDA is a recognized architecture method in The Open Group’s architect certification program.

Presenters
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

CGI
Eltjo R. Poort is a Lead Expert on Solution Architecture at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the United States. In the last decade, he produced various publications on improving architecting practices, including his PhD thesis in 2012. Eltjo is best known... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
2. Salon D

10:30am

Sustainably Supporting Data Variability
A big challenge in building complex, data-intensive systems is how to sustainably support data variation, schema, and feature evolution. In this session, three speakers—Atzmon Hen-Tov, a senior architect of a highly adaptable Telco platform; Jordan Menzin, architect of a Boston Health Economics’ health-care analytics system; and Joseph Yoder of The Refactory—share their experiences and hard-fought wisdom gained from building complex, data-intensive systems. Their three talks will be followed by a short Q&A session.

Invited Talk: Data Upgrade as a First-Class Citizen

Atzmon Hen-Tov explains how the ModelTalk system addresses data upgrade as an integral part of its product line architecture. Complex, large-scale business support systems in the telecommunication industry require high dependability while market pressures demand frequent releases. One aspect that hampers agility in a highly dependable system is data migration. In Pontis’ ModelTalk, an executable modeling framework, upgrades are first-class citizens, allowing for rapid evolution, agility, and reuse while at the same time supporting multiple persistency technologies.

Invited Talk: High-Performance Dynamic Health-Care Analytics

Jordan Menzin of Boston Health Economics (BHE) reviews the core architecture and key decisions that went into the creation of Instant Health Data, a highly performant health-care analytics system. Leveraging distributed computing and domain modeling, BHE has created an extensible platform that enables researchers to complete analytics projects using diverse data sources without the need for custom programming. This enables them to process large health-care data sets an order of magnitude faster than with legacy technologies.

Invited Talk: Keeping Core Components Clean While Dealing with Data Variability

Joseph Yoder of The Refactory examines strategies, practices, and patterns drawn from real experiences that support new and evolving data-processing requirements while keeping the core architecture clean. As complex systems evolve to meet varying data formats, they can devolve into poorly architected Big Balls of Mud filled with special-case logic and one-off processing. Alternatively, you can isolate core components of your system and protect them from entanglements and unnecessary complexity by designing them to operate on common data formats while providing extension mechanisms that enable processing variations.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-­Brock Associates
Rebecca Wirfs-­Brock is an innovator in software architecture and design techniques and author of two popular object design books. Although best known as the creator of Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDD meme, she is also interested in simply expressing complex requirements and effectively designing software architecture. She is Director of the Agile Alliance's Experience Report Program and a co-founder of the Agile Open... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

11:00am

Introduction to Architecture-Centric Design Thinking
Designing the architecture for software-intensive systems can be difficult, even for experienced architects, let alone developers transitioning into an architect’s role. While the prevailing literature does a great job of describing core software architecture concepts, it does a relatively poor job of sharing practical advice for how to actually “do” design. As a result we, as a software architecture community, know a lot about software architecture but have a hard time teaching new architects how to apply this knowledge.

Design Thinking is a framework for understanding and creatively resolving problems. Design Thinking practices are often human-centered and encourage designers to build empathy with stakeholders who experience the problem and will ultimately benefit from a solution. While Design Thinking has roots in industrial design and urban planning, it has only recently been applied within the software industry and only then within the relatively narrow scope of user interface design. This is too bad as I’ve found Design Thinking to be a useful tool in the context of software architecture as well.

During this talk I will share my experiences adapting practices from the user experience community for use in architecture-centric design. I will first establish a foundation for user-focused design theory and then describe practical methods for applying design thinking in the context of software architecture with examples from my direct experience.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
3. Salon E

11:30am

Systems of Action: A Stack Model for Capability Classification
For almost 10 years, Statoil’s IT has worked on how to best develop and deploy what we have called systems of action, systems that are described by three key capabilities: First, they can observe a phenomena, process, or machine. Second, they process their observations in search of anomalies and deviations that must be dealt with. Third, they identify and execute the best possible actions to bring the observed phenomena, process, or machine back to its desired state. In parallel they monitor the effects of their actions and re-plan and adapt their actions based on observed effects.

Systems of action will operate with some level of autonomy; they will interact with human operators in trust-based collaborations, and they can be tasked with missions. They build heavily on the theory and concepts of rational agents and multi-agent systems as defined by Shoham and Leyton-Brown: “a combination of multiple autonomous entities, each having divergent interests or different information, or both.”

Their development involves use of cybernetics and AI technologies, including decision theory, learning, and belief representation. Architecturally they have a lot in common with what is called microservices. To ease development of systems of action, we have developed a stack model defining a capability hierarchy that we used to position applicable technologies.

Presenters
avatar for Einar Landre

Einar Landre

Statoil
Einar Landre is a practicing software professional with almost 30 years of experience as a developer, consultant, leader, and presenter. Currently he holds the position as leader of Statoil's value chain IT unit, where he is responsible for the products and services used to support Statoil's well construction process. He is an IEEE Certified Software Development Professional and has a Master of Science in Information Technology from the... Read More →
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Statoil
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc degree in computer science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Tuesday April 28, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
3. Salon E

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday April 28, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
6. Refreshment Area

1:00pm

The Value of Architecture and Architects

IT departments and architects are increasingly called on to drive real business value. Frequently architects work hard on delivering the design of a solution, details of an infrastructure, usage of information, and goals and capabilities of an enterprise. During this process, they use frameworks, appropriate tools, and patterns. However, the majority of software, solution, and enterprise architects are constantly challenged in industry to prove the value of architecture to business.

In this presentation, we review how architects can achieve value through both design decisions and strategic involvement. We will discuss the value contribution categories, or roles that architects can play, to make architecture and architects successful. I will focus on sharing techniques and lessons learned from being part of and managing large teams of architects. Ultimately these techniques will enable immediate and long-term impact as we wear the hats of Evangelist, Collaborator, Counselor, and Subject-Matter Expert.


Presenters
avatar for Shrikant Palkar

Shrikant Palkar

Director, Enterprise Architect, Costco Wholesale
In his role as enterprise architect, Shrikant Palkar develops strategies to support Costco’s business needs, focusing on application architecture, infrastructure, business process management, and IT process improvement. Shrikant has a passion for education and has taught in more than 20 institutes in three countries; he was a visiting scholar at Carnegie Mellon University and is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Washington in... Read More →
avatar for Paul Preiss

Paul Preiss

Iasa Global
Paul Preiss is the CEO and founder of Iasa Global, the world’s largest IT architect association. Prior to Iasa, Paul was director of engineering and chief architect of a large digital asset management company and the chief architect at Dell Pan Asia, Japan. He has also worked on many large projects for DHL, Sears, IBM, and others. Through his experience with the architecture profession, Paul has provided insight into the workings of the... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
3. Salon E

1:00pm

Software Architecture Boot Camp: All About QA Requirements
Designed to provide developers with essential introductory information about software architecture

Presenters
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics, and agile development. Her recent research focuses on managing technical debt in large-scale, software-intensive... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 1:00pm - 2:30pm
5. Salon B

1:00pm

ADD 3.0: Rethinking Drivers and Decisions in the Design Process
Attribute Driven Design (ADD)—a method for designing software architectures—was developed by the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. The first version of ADD was published in January 2000, and the second version was published in November 2006. Recently we have made some improvements to the method to increase its adoption by the software architecture community. ADD 2.0 focused on a conceptual architecture design and promoted the use of Patterns and Tactics as key concepts that drive the design process. Our experience, however, has shown that other important design concepts, including reference architectures and frameworks, are used in architectural design by practitioners. Furthermore, when ADD 2.0 was created, agile methods were not widespread. As a consequence, the method does not provide insights on how to use it in a more agile setting. To address these issues, we have created a new version of the method that we call ADD 3.0.

In this tutorial, we will introduce ADD 3.0 and explain the key changes that we made to its previous version. We will also present a detailed case study and walk the participants through a few iterations of the method, showing how the steps are performed. We will place particular emphasis on the design decisions that are made in the different design iterations. Finally, we will make a brief comparison of ADD to other design methods and close with a general discussion.

Presenters
avatar for Humberto Cervantes

Humberto Cervantes

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Iztapalapa
Dr. Humberto Cervantes is a professor at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Iztapalapa in Mexico City. His primary research interests include software architecture design methods and their adoption in industrial settings. Dr. Cervantes is also a consultant for software development companies in topics related to software architecture. He has helped Quarksoft, a leading Mexican development company, to integrate architecture methods... Read More →
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Rick Kazman is a professor at the University of Hawaii and a research scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 1:00pm - 2:30pm
2. Salon D

1:00pm

DevOps Essentials for Software Architects
Software architects tend to think in terms of "code complete." But  "code complete" is not "code in production." There are potentially long delays between the time that code is complete and the time that code is placed into production. These delays are caused by the necessity for coordination among all of the various stakeholders to achieve consistency in both the developed code and the supporting technologies and libraries.

DevOps is a set of practices intended to reduce the time between committing a change to a system and placing that change into normal production, while ensuring high quality. That is, the goal of DevOps is to reduce the time between code complete and code in production. One important technique is to have a tool chain that automatically places code into production after a commit. This is called continuous deployment. Continuous deployment is most effective when coupled with the use of a microservice architecture.

In this session, three experts in DevOps will lead you through a discussion of "What is DevOps?" "What is continuous deployment?" and "What is microservice architecture?" You will come away not only with an appreciation of the reasons for the time between code complete and code in production but also with a collection of techniques that will enable you to reduce that time in your organization.

Invited Talk: Principles of Microservices

Sam Newman discusses the buzz that we have seen around microservices over the last year and explains that there has often been a lack of clarity as to what microservices are or how to implement them well. I've been working to distill the principles of microservices to help ensure that we don't just end up repeating the mistakes we made during the last 20 years of service-oriented architecture.

I'll talk about the history of where microservices came from, what they are, the benefits and downsides, and the core principles to stick to in order to do to them well.

Moderators
avatar for Len Bass

Len Bass

Len Bass was a Senior Principal Researcher at National ICT Australia Ltd. (NICTA). He joined NICTA in 2011 after 25 years at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He is the coauthor of two award-winning books in software architecture, Software Architecture in Practice and Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond, as well as several other books and numerous papers in computer science and software engineering. Len has more... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 1:00pm - 2:30pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

1:30pm

The Business Side of a Software Architect
One of a software architect’s roles is to translate business needs into software and to verify that a running software satisfies business needs. It is obvious that in order to translate between two different languages, one must know both languages to a satisfying level. Is this also the case with software architects? As most software architects rose from the software world, how important is it that those architects also speak “business” fluently? When building the software architecture group in my company, we had to answer this question while considering the required knowledge, experience, and training program for software architects.

One challenge that we frequently face is how to efficiently translate business needs to running software, specifically in projects that involve many nontechnical stakeholders. The software architects’ ability to understand the business environment and to identify lacks in the alignments between software requirements and business drivers is essential. This ability requires extracting business-related information and using it as part of software architecture processes, such as QAWs and ATAMs.

When facing the business world, the software architect meets new terms, models, and mindsets. The ability of a software architect to understand models such as strategic differentiation, levels of product, and segment invasion strategy helped us bridge the gap between those two worlds. In this presentation, we share these experiences and ideas, through which understanding business terms, models, and methodologies can assist software architects to achieve their goals more effectively.

Presenters
avatar for Tomer Peretz

Tomer Peretz

Orbotech
Over the last 14 years, Tomer Peretz has practiced developing, managing, teaching, and mentoring software. He is currently working as a chief software architect at Orbotech and as a presidency member at ILTAM, the Israeli Users' Association of Advanced Technologies in Hi-Tec Integrated Systems. Last December Peretz co-founded and served as the program committee co-chair of the First Israeli Conference on Software Architecture. Tomer Peretz... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
3. Salon E

2:00pm

A Partner Is Good to Have, but Difficult to Be
This workshop will help participants build partnering skills and avoid pitfalls through games, examples, and discussion and show how these skills can produce better results for the architecture team and its customers. Architecture efforts can be sidelined without the engagement and trust of software developers and project managers, yet architects do not always see collaboration and service as part of their role. Lack of collaboration and service on the part of an architect can result in an architect’s
  • uncertainty about whether and how well products are being used or delivering value
  • products and guidance being “worked around” rather than incorporated
  • rigid and less-than-effective use of stakeholder-related architecture practices

We will illustrate the importance of partnering in the context of architecture. We define partnering as “the extent to which architecture stakeholders maintain clear, cooperative roles and maximize the value that they deliver and receive.” We will also share and facilitate a discussion using hands-on ideas and examples of how to build on existing partner relationships to increase engagement and trust.

Presenters
avatar for Dave Dikel

Dave Dikel

InSysCo
Dave Dikel is a senior information technology specialist with InSysCo, an Acentia Company, supporting a large software program for the U.S. government. His role is to ensure that new development activities integrate with existing systems and business processes and deliver improved services. Dikel draws on over 30 years’ experience leading and supporting analysis, architecture, and product development efforts in commercial and government... Read More →
avatar for David Kane

David Kane

Santeon Group
David Kane is a senior agile coach with the Santeon Group, bringing over 20 years of IT experience in both the commercial and government sectors. He has been leading and coaching teams through agile approaches since 2001. He is coauthor of the book Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns as well as many articles on software development.

Tuesday April 28, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
3. Salon E

2:30pm

3:00pm

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Architecture Evaluation
Designed to provide developers with essential introductory information about software architecture

Course Instructors
avatar for Robert Nord

Robert Nord

Robert Nord is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI), where he develops effective methods and practices for software architecture. He also leads research on strategies for scaling agile development by incorporating architecture practices. Before joining the SEI, he worked in industry, where he balanced research in software architecture with work in designing and evaluating large-scale... Read More →


Tuesday April 28, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
5. Salon B

3:00pm

Design Thinking Is for You
User Experience and Design is not an isolated function or a step in the software development process anymore. It has evolved from a specialty to a way of working that puts users at the center and permeates most development activities throughout the release cycle. 

There is a clear shift away from design just as a product (i.e., specific deliverables and artifacts such as high-fidelity mockups to throw over the wall to developers) that continues to gain momentum as the activity of design that focuses on understanding and solving a specific problem for a specific set of users.

Jeff Patton, one of the fathers of modern User Experience and bringing UX into Agile, will share his insights from the perspective of a developer who has moved into design. On the other hand, Jonathan Berger, an agile design practitioner and speaker, will tell us about his experience as a designer who has ventured in the world of coding and software development. Their 30-minute talks will be followed by a Q&A session.

Moderators
avatar for Ariadna Font Llitjós

Ariadna Font Llitjós

IBM Watson Group
Ariadna Font Llitjós is a Design Principal and Manager at IBM Watson Group, where she works with cross-functional teams to design and implement the next generation of cognitive systems. She is spearheading the adoption of Lean UX and user-centric design and development to empower teams and improve communication. She is a regular speaker at Lean UX and Agile conferences and enjoys facilitating collaborative design workshops. Her previous... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

3:00pm

From Monolith to Microservices: A Leadership Perspective on Legacy Application Modernization
In this presentation, we will share some thoughts on the leadership challenges that come with modernizing legacy systems. Our reference case is an ongoing modernization of a 20-year-old custom-made client/server application consisting of about 3.5 million lines of code. The modernization effort is driven by a need to reduce cost of ownership, position the system for new deployment models such as cloud, and facilitate shorter time to market for new business features. It is also about reducing vulnerability, as there are more developers in the market who are masters of JavaScript than of PowerBuilder.

From an architectural perspective, the aim is twofold. First, consolidate on fewer but more up-to-date technologies. Second, create a more loosely coupled architecture by introducing functional separation through horizontal and vertical slicing, in many ways moving toward what today is called “microservices,” and do this in line with the principles in our management system, adhering to natural business process boundaries.

From a leadership perspective, the challenge is to effect the cultural and organizational changes needed to create architecture in line with modern principles, seizing the opportunities offered by new technology. We need to break the mindset incurred by the relational database—that everything has to be interconnected in a global model—and replace this by a mindset and technology that support deployment of smaller but cohesive functional services or modules. A major challenge here is technologically outdated domain experts, key stakeholders who are stuck in the possibilities of yesterday's technology.

Presenters
avatar for Einar Landre

Einar Landre

Statoil
Einar Landre is a practicing software professional with almost 30 years of experience as a developer, consultant, leader, and presenter. Currently he holds the position as leader of Statoil's value chain IT unit, where he is responsible for the products and services used to support Statoil's well construction process. He is an IEEE Certified Software Development Professional and has a Master of Science in Information Technology from the... Read More →
avatar for Harald Wesenberg

Harald Wesenberg

Statoil
Harald Wesenberg is a practicing software professional who has returned to the trenches after many years as a leading advisor in Corporate II, where he was responsible for enterprise architecture. He holds an MSc degree in computer science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Statoil
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc degree in computer science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Tuesday April 28, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
2. Salon D

3:30pm

Improving Architectural Refactoring Using Kanban and the Mikado Method
Have you ever found yourself making a change to a system only to have dozens of bugs or other issues pop up? Then you make some more changes trying to solve those and, yikes, more are found! You're on the software spelunking trip from hell with the cavern walls collapsing...

Embrace the Zen of the Mikado Method. This powerful approach allows you to discover, visualize, and safely make all the changes you need without losing your mind by giving you input into dependencies that can drive your work priorities. Since it contains a visualization technique, it can help your teams understand legacy code and its impacts and then communicate these to stakeholders. Combine this with a Kanban board to help you visualize your progress, and now you can easily see how well you are making progress.

This 30-minute presentation will step you through the following topics:
  • What is the Mikado Method?
  • How does it work?
  • Exploring the issues and populating the Kanban backlog
  • Why is Kanban a good fit for maintenance?

Presenters
avatar for Paul Boos

Paul Boos

Santeon Group
Paul Boos serves as a coach helping executives, senior managers, and teams transform their software development thinking and learn how to effectively lead. A passionate learner, he has continued to experientially learn better ways to do things in management positions inside the federal government, with contractors, in the commercial software product industry, and as a naval officer over his 28-year career.

Tuesday April 28, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
3. Salon E

4:00pm

What Coderetreats Have Taught Us About Design
Coderetreats are daylong, intensive practice events that focus on software development and design fundamentals. The coderetreat format provides developers with an opportunity for focused practice and skills development away from day-to-day job pressures. During a coderetreat, participants work in pairs to implement Conway's Game of Life in any programming language of their choice. A brief reflection discussion follows each development session, after which participants delete their code, find a new pair, and repeat the exercise with a new set of design constraints chosen by the facilitator.

Practicing basic software development principles (such as object-oriented design, functional programming design, and design simplicity) improves developer mastery and awareness of important architectural principles, including designing for specific quality attributes such as modifiability, maintainability, testability, and extensibility. Coderetreat participants explore many alternative designs and architectures throughout the day with the goal of discovering designs with a low cost of change.

During this presentation, we will share our story about using coderetreats at IBM as a means of knowledge sharing, team building, and fostering a sense of craftsmanship across organizational boundaries. We will share what we have learned about software design and architecture after facilitating and observing five years of coderetreats, both publicly and within IBM.

Presenters
avatar for Jim Hurne

Jim Hurne

IBM Watson Group
Jim Hurne is a senior software engineer for the IBM Watson Group and is a leader within the global coderetreat community. Jim has facilitated countless coderetreats and has trained hundreds of coderetreat facilitators. He has also served as the lead organizer for the Global Day of Coderetreat.
avatar for Joseph Kramer

Joseph Kramer

IBM Watson Group
Joseph Kramer started in software development but recently transitioned to technical management within the IBM Watson group. Joseph has facilitated many coderetreats and was instrumental in helping the IBM Watson group to adapt coderetreat as a regular practice.

Tuesday April 28, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
3. Salon E

4:45pm

Special Announcement
Presenters
avatar for Paul Nielsen

Paul Nielsen

Director and CEO, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Paul D. Nielsen is Director and Chief Executive Officer of the SEI. Since joining the SEI in August 2004, Nielsen has overseen the development and expansion of CERT, which is responsible for the SEI’s network/cybersecurity efforts, and an increase in research activities related to software architecture, complex systems, and cybersecurity to address both present and future challenges. Prior to joining the SEI in 2004, Nielsen served in... Read More →

Tuesday April 28, 2015 4:45pm - 5:00pm
4. Salon C: General Sessions

5:00pm

Microservices Trial

Microservices architecture has emerged as a widely discussed style of building distributed web and internet systems. Proponents argue that this variant of service-oriented architecture (SOA) is well suited to address the challenges of cloud computing, scalability, increased flexibility, and complexity, among others.  

But haven’t we seen this all before? Is there really anything new and interesting about microservices architecture? Or is this simply a case of history repeating itself, like the last time SOAs were all the rage?

Microservices architecture is hereby charged with being an attractive nuisance in the first degree. SATURN 2015 has recruited an expert panel of judges to debate the benefits and perils of microservices architecture and help you, the jury, learn the facts and determine the final verdict.


Tuesday April 28, 2015 5:00pm - 6:00pm
4. Salon C: General Sessions

6:30pm

IBM Presentation and Reception

You’re Invited! If you are interested in

  • Cloud App Development
  • Cognitive Computing
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Machine Learning

 

Join us at this complimentary event to learn about IBM’s newly announced Watson Developer Cloud. Find out how you can leverage a collection of REST APIS and SDKS that use cognitive computing to solve complex problems and build brand-new apps.

 Meet the Watson team members and learn about exciting career opportunities!

Space is limited, so please RSVP by April 27.



Tuesday April 28, 2015 6:30pm - 7:30pm
4. Salon C: General Sessions
 
Wednesday, April 29
 

7:30am

8:00am

Morning Beverages
Attendees staying within the SATURN hotel-room block receive a voucher good for breakfast each day of their stay in the hotel restaurant.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
6. Refreshment Area

9:00am

Cost-Benefit Analysis in Technical Debt Reduction
A software project is so burdened with technical debt that it can hardly move forward with new features. As an architect, how will you set goals for reducing technical debt, calculate their relative costs and benefits, and develop an executable road map? This report proposes a practical approach proven by a real-world case study
  • using quality attribute scenarios to analyze technical debt
  • using cost-benefit analysis for reducing technical debt
  • building a road map for reducing technical debt

A professional software engineer or an architect understands very well what technical debt is and how it burdens product development. However, coming up with a case that will convince management to allocate time and resources to its reduction often proves difficult when there is a full stack of functional must-have features on the table.

The presentation provides a case study for a practical approach to cost-benefit analysis of technical debt based on eliciting quality attribute scenarios and employing the SEI Cost Benefit Analysis Method (CBAM). This approach was successfully applied in an architectural assessment conducted by a team of SoftServe consultants including the author for a major international networking hardware and software vendor, and it resulted in building and executing a roadmap to optimize technical debt reduction for the assessed product.

Presenters
avatar for Andriy Shapochka

Andriy Shapochka

SoftServe, Inc.
Andriy Shapochka is a principal software architect at SoftServe, Inc. He has more than 17 years of experience in enterprise and SaaS software architecture design, consulting, development, and Agile team leadership in the United States and Europe.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:00am - 9:15am
3. Salon E

9:00am

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Documenting Software Architecture
Designed to provide developers with essential introductory information about software architecture

Course Instructors
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line architecture... Read More →


Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
5. Salon B

9:00am

Architecting Public-Facing Website Software for High Concurrent User Load
It’s always important to architect public-facing websites to be responsive under high concurrent user load. Although part of this can be achieved using hardware infrastructure upgrades, nowadays performance is more heavily influenced by the software architecture, as noted in Dan Kegel’s C10K problem. This session will cover some lessons learned through experience and research about analyzing the problems of an existing public-facing website, and it will use the lessons learned from the analysis to develop some suggested enterprise architectural patterns to resolve them. The lessons learned include
  • web content management (WCM) content delivery architecture: the decoupled content delivery pattern
  • architecting online real-time features: the web real-time communication pattern

Upon completion, the audience will have two architectural patterns to help with architecting public-facing websites as well as an understanding of how I came to these theorems. This subject matter is mostly focused on architecting for two specific engineering paradigms that will be part of SATURN 2015:
  1. SOAs and concurrent/event-driven systems
  2. high-scale, high-volume web applications

Presenters
avatar for Derrick Lau

Derrick Lau

Derrick Lau has roughly 17 years of software development experience, of which 9 were in the ECM space and 5 were in the event-driven web application space. He is also an EMC-certified Content Management Specialist and Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer and has published articles for both EMC and MSDN Magazine.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
2. Salon D

9:00am

Open Systems Architecture: Progress and Challenges
Open systems architecture (OSA), an approach that integrates business and technical practices to create systems with interoperable and reusable components, has outstanding potential for creating resilient and adaptable systems, but the associated challenges make OSA one of the most ambitious endeavors in software architecture today. This panel discussion will focus on the progress made so far, the remaining challenges, and strategies for addressing those challenges.

Panel members will speak about OSA from several perspectives, including technical engineering, policy, contracting, and science and technology research. Participants will discuss their experiences with the practical trials of OSA and offer multiple perspectives—which might challenge one another—related to the technical, organizational, and business aspects of making it a reality.

Audience members from many different backgrounds will benefit from this discussion. OSA is a growing area of interest for the Department of Defense (DoD) as important DoD stakeholders recognize its significant potential. Federal workers who attend this panel will take away an understanding of where things really stand with OSA: How much is hype and how much is reality? General practitioners will also benefit from the lessons learned from the OSA adoption push, such as how software architecture can support reconfigurability, recomposability, and other -ilities.

OSA is a promising and important undertaking that deserves a broad, realistic treatment of what has been accomplished so far, how much of the underpinning is technical (especially architectural) versus organizational or business related, and how far we really have to go before its potential becomes reality.

Moderators
avatar for Forrest Shull

Forrest Shull

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Forrest Shull is Assistant Director for Empirical Research at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. His leads work with the U.S. Department of Defense, national labs, industry, and academic institutions to advance the use of empirically grounded information in software engineering, cybersecurity, and emerging technologies. He has led research at NASA’s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, DARPA, the National... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
1. Baltimore Theatre

9:15am

Why They Just Don't Get It: Communicating Architecture to Business Stakeholders
Communicating about architecture is hard, especially with stakeholders who do not have technical backgrounds. Many architects use standardized languages like UML or ArchiMate as their weapon of choice, because of their universal applicability and formalized semantics. But often, such diagrams do more harm than good. They confuse the stakeholders, or they are dismissed as being “just for techies.” Using these diagrams to explain your architecture to nontechnical stakeholders can feel like teaching someone how to drive a car by handing over the technical design schematics—frustrating to everyone and not effective at all.

We present practices and techniques for creating architecture visualizations that are attractive, informative, and easy to understand for nontechnical audiences. We have developed and applied these techniques in all kinds of organizations as architecture consultants and trainers. Throughout the talk, we will show examples from actual practice of great and not-so-great attempts in visualizing architecture. We offer techniques and practices that help you sell your architecture proposal, communicate the current and desired state of an organization’s architecture, or create that much-craved sense of urgency, even when faced with the pointiest haired of bosses.

After our presentation, attendees will have learned
  • why communication about architecture should be done in a language that is tailored to the audience’s needs
  • creative ways to effectively communicate about IT architecture with nonarchitects
  • how to incorporate business aspects in descriptions/visualizations of IT architectures
  • how to deal with business people's different backgrounds, interests, and skills

Presenters
avatar for Eelco Rommes

Eelco Rommes

inspearit/cibit academy
Eelco Rommes is a consultant and trainer at inspearit / cibit academy. He works with IT organizations to improve their architecting capabilities, often by visualizing the present IT architectures and fostering collaboration with stakeholders. As a trainer, he gives master classes on IT architecture in practice, and on visualizing and communicating architectures.
avatar for Jochem Schulenklopper

Jochem Schulenklopper

inspearit
Jochem Schulenklopper is consultant at inspearit on topics related to IT architecture, software quality, and web technology. In client projects, he assesses current IT architectures and their descriptions, and he acts as an IT architect, designing and developing IT solutions for business challenges.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:15am - 9:45am
3. Salon E

9:45am

Quality Requirements on a Shoestring
Traditional Quality Attribute Workshops (QAWs) are costly and cumbersome to organize for large and/or geographically dispersed organizations. Yet good quality requirements are key to making the right architectural decisions in the design process. At SATURN 2014, Chaparro and Keeling presented the mini-QAW, proposing a way to pare down the QAW activities and do part of the work offline. We extend their format with a stakeholder empathy exercise to fill in for absent stakeholders. During the exercise, participants brainstorm to create a list of stakeholders for the system. Each participant chooses a stakeholder from the list to empathize with and create scenarios for, before listing his or her own concerns. In addition, we propose the use of UI mockups as a method to support quality attribute scenario generation. The method is an alternative to quality attribute taxonomies or unstructured brainstorming. Finally, we report how we used the Microsoft Lync online meeting tool to include remote stakeholders via its annotation feature. With our changes, we successfully ran two QAWs of 2 and 3.5 hours at ABB. We can now rely on a smaller set of stakeholders and do not need all stakeholders to travel to the same location. This contributes to a lower time investment for the QAW and reduced travel cost for participants. A workshop according to the mini-QAW format will not give results of the same depth and breadth as a traditional QAW but should be used as a tool for smaller, low-risk, or iterative projects.

Presenters
avatar for Thijmen de Gooijer

Thijmen de Gooijer

Scientist, ABB Corporate Research
Thijmen works at ABB Corporate Research–Sweden in a team of software architects and user-experience researchers. He graduated cum laude in software engineering with a double MSc degree from VU University in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) and Malardalen Univeristy in Västerås (Sweden). At ABB since 2011, he has co-authored over ten research papers and collaborates with colleagues in Europe, India, and the United States on applied... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
3. Salon E

10:15am

Keeping the Beat: Rhythm and Trust in Architecture
Maintaining an effective rhythm has long been recognized as an attribute of successful architecture. It is easier for the many organizations involved with the architecture if there is a predictable tempo, content, and quality associated with the architecture. Rhythm is also an important quality of many agile software development methods. I define rhythm in this context as “the recurring, predictable exchange of work products within an architecture group and across its customers and suppliers.” This talk will argue that rhythm is important for establishing trust in architecture and architects. The talk will also present some ideas on how architects can establish and sustain an effective rhythm. 

Presenters
avatar for David Kane

David Kane

Santeon Group
David Kane is a senior agile coach with the Santeon Group, bringing over 20 years of IT experience in both the commercial and government sectors. He has been leading and coaching teams through agile approaches since 2001. He is coauthor of the book Software Architecture: Organizational Principles and Patterns as well as many articles on software development.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 10:15am - 10:30am
3. Salon E

10:30am

Morning Break
Wednesday April 29, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
6. Refreshment Area

11:00am

Living a Nightmare, Dreaming a Dream: A Drupal Deployment Dilemma
Two and a half years ago, I started a new job. I was very excited, and I looked forward to making my mark in the first 90 days before tackling any big issues. A few weeks into this new job, the system administrator began complaining about having to explain yet again the steps to deploy a release. I started asking questions. What I discovered shocked and appalled me, and it spurred me to dream a dream. This sys admin described a process for deploying a release to production, for even tiny code changes, that involved three repetitions of manual regression tests, putting the entire site into maintenance mode, working between midnight and 4:00 a.m., and other nightmarish procedures. I embarked on a quest to bring this organization into the 21st century of infrastructure and development best practices. In broad strokes, this involved organizational changes in the department by creating new roles and reporting relationships, motivating key individuals, introducing new development practices, and, of course, introducing new technologies. Our experiences show three key results: motivational changes are tightly aligned with organizational changes, ops and dev working collaboratively is mandatory, and technology choice matters least of all.

Presenters
avatar for Gail E. Harris

Gail E. Harris

TVOntario
Gail Harris is the director and architect of web and mobile delivery at TVOntario (TVO), Ontario's public educational media organization. Gail oversees all technical and operational aspects of TVO's web and mobile presence, long-term technology strategy, development methods, and software practices. Before joining TVO, Gail was a principal and co-owner of Instantiated Software, a company that applied agile methodologies and open source... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
3. Salon E

11:00am

Office Hours: Design Thinking Is for You; Sustainably Supporting Data Variability; Open Systems Architecture: Progress and Challenges
Topic leaders facilitate open conversations about the sessions that they led.

Moderators
avatar for Ariadna Font Llitjós

Ariadna Font Llitjós

IBM Watson Group
Ariadna Font Llitjós is a Design Principal and Manager at IBM Watson Group, where she works with cross-functional teams to design and implement the next generation of cognitive systems. She is spearheading the adoption of Lean UX and user-centric design and development to empower teams and improve communication. She is a regular speaker at Lean UX and Agile conferences and enjoys facilitating collaborative design workshops. Her previous... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-­Brock Associates
Rebecca Wirfs-­Brock is an innovator in software architecture and design techniques and author of two popular object design books. Although best known as the creator of Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDD meme, she is also interested in simply expressing complex requirements and effectively designing software architecture. She is Director of the Agile Alliance's Experience Report Program and a co-founder of the Agile Open... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
5. Salon B

11:00am

Smart Decisions: An Architecture Design Game
In this participatory session, you’ll have fun and learn about the challenging process of designing an architecture for a Big Data Analytics System by playing a game called Smart Decisions, which simulates the architecture design process through a series of iterations. The game can be played individually or as a group of architects, and the players compete against each other in a simulated architecture design activity for a complex Big Data Analytics System. In each iteration, the players must solve a challenge associated with an iteration goal and a set of architectural drivers including quality attributes and constraints. Solving this challenge requires making design decisions that, in the game, are the selection of one or more design concepts such as tactics, patterns, or externally developed components such as frameworks. Players are scored according to the choices they make, and the player who completes the challenge and gets the highest score wins.

The game is followed by a discussion with the participants in which we review several principles illustrated in the game, including these points:
  • Architecture design can be performed systematically in an iterative way.
  • Each iteration has a goal and a set of associated drivers or concerns.
  • Quality attributes can have different meanings.
  • There exist different types of design concepts and a wide variety of each type.
  • Selection of design concepts needs to be made by taking into account several aspects including the iteration goal, concerns, drivers, and prior decisions.

Presenters
avatar for Humberto Cervantes

Humberto Cervantes

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Iztapalapa
Dr. Humberto Cervantes is a professor at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Iztapalapa in Mexico City. His primary research interests include software architecture design methods and their adoption in industrial settings. Dr. Cervantes is also a consultant for software development companies in topics related to software architecture. He has helped Quarksoft, a leading Mexican development company, to integrate architecture methods... Read More →
avatar for Serge Haziyev

Serge Haziyev

SoftServe, Inc.
Serhiy Haziyev works as a VP of Software Architecture at SoftServe, Inc., a leading global outsourced product and application development company. Serhiy has an SEI Software Architecture Professional certificate and more than 15 years of experience in enterprise-level solutions including big data, SaaS/cloud, SOA, and carrier-grade telecommunication services. His current activities at SoftServe include leading, mentoring, and motivating the... Read More →
avatar for Olha Hrytsay

Olha Hrytsay

SoftServe, Inc.
Olha Hrytsay works as a BI/DW consultant at SoftServe, Inc., a leading global outsourced product and application development company. Olha has more than seven years of experience in building business intelligence, data warehousing, and big-data solutions for a number of global companies in the network security, health care, and finance business domains. Her current activities at SoftServe include leading the BI Center of Excellence as well as... Read More →
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Rick Kazman is a professor at the University of Hawaii and a research scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
2. Salon D

11:00am

Software Architecture as Code
Over the past few years, I’ve been distilling software architecture down to its essence, helping organizations adopt a lightweight style of software architecture that complements agile approaches. This includes doing "just enough" up-front design to understand the significant structural elements of the software, making some lightweight sketches to communicate that vision to the team, identifying the highest priority risks, and mitigating them with concrete experiments. Software architecture is inherently about technical leadership, stacking the odds of success in your favour and ensuring that everybody is heading in the same direction.

But it’s 2015 and, with so much technology at our disposal, we’re still manually drawing software architecture diagrams in tools like Microsoft Visio. Furthermore, these diagrams often don’t reflect the implementation in code, and vice versa. This session will look at why this happens and how to resolve the conflict between software architecture and code through the use of architecturally evident coding styles and the representation of software architecture models as code.

Moderators
avatar for Simon Brown

Simon Brown

Coding the Architecture
Simon Brown is an independent consultant who helps organizations build better software by adopting a lightweight, pragmatic approach to software architecture. He is the creator of the C4 software architecture model and the author of Software Architecture for Developers, a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility. Simon regularly speaks at software development conferences around the... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

11:30am

Open Medical Record System Plus (OpenMRS+): OpenMRS for Non-Communicable Diseases
In developing countries where the health-care industry continues to experience significant challenges that hamper the provision of health-care services, interoperability and the connection of medical records are still an unrealized goal. Even though different types of medical record systems have been adopted, the journey continues due to environment, infrastructure, and financial issues. With the growth of information technology, the health-care sector has significantly improved, adopting various web- and mobile-based electronic medical records. A significant achievement has been the use of the Open-Source Medical Record System (OpenMRS) for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis health-care services in developing countries such as Kenya and Rwanda. This system has proven to be more reliable and efficient for patient follow-up and allows for better health-care services in general.

In this presentation, I will describe the role that OpenMRS has played in the Rwanda health-care sector, why and how to expand its use to the treatment of noncommunicable diseases, and the process that should be followed in order to develop a new and complete module strictly designed for these diseases.

Presenters
avatar for Gloria Ingabire

Gloria Ingabire

Carnegie Mellon University
Gloria Ingabire is master’s student of information technology at Carnegie Mellon University with a BS in Computer Science from the National University of Rwanda. She is Vice President of the Student Network on Population and Development, in which she uses ICT to educate Rwandan communities about the role of family planning. Ingabire also co-founded E-IGA Ltd., a startup that aims to improve learning through technology, and she developed... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
3. Salon E

12:30pm

Lunch
Wednesday April 29, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
6. Refreshment Area

1:30pm

Keynote: It's Good to Be Architect
Many companies and communities associate the title "architect" with negative connotations: architects are people who live in the ivory tower, are out of touch with reality, and make poor decisions driven by the quest for irrelevant and unobtainable technical ideals. Because these architects can't code, they relentlessly bestow their thoughts upon developers with diagrams and wall-sized posters. 

Still, architecture is more relevant than ever. New digital business models require new architectures: many advances in distributed architectures are driven by the internet giants, who are building infrastructures to support their fast-moving businesses at the bleeding edge of innovation. Not too far behind, "traditional" corporate IT is also moving from a mere cost center to a business enabler and driver, with architects playing a key role as the connecting element between business and IT.

Is being a software architect not so bad after all? Or are we just getting cozy in the world of perfect, but irrelevant, designs? The anecdotes and war stories from a Silicon Valley developer turned corporate IT architect aim to provide some insights into our field and our mission.

Speakers
avatar for Gregor Hohpe

Gregor Hohpe

Allianz
As Chief IT Architect at Allianz, Gregor Hohpe is responsible for driving the digital transformation of the Allianz IT. Gregor draws on 15 years’ experience in Silicon Valley and 5 years in Tokyo where he optimized mobile advertising and connected online and physical worlds for Google. He is widely known as a co-author of the seminal book Enterprise Integration Patterns and as a frequent speaker at conferences around the world. His... Read More →


Wednesday April 29, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
4. Salon C: General Sessions

2:30pm

3:00pm

Never Again Offline?! Experiences in the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem
Data is key in information systems. Nevertheless, explicit design of data is often neglected in architecture design because of the focus on components, decisions, or technology selection. We want to change this and put data in the center of the story.

We will share our experiences from an innovation and development project of John Deere and Fraunhofer IESE. We developed a mobile app ecosystem with several apps and its own cloud backend. During the course of the project, we learned that we had to pay more and more attention to the role of data due to its impact on the quality attributes performance, scalability, user experience, and security.

Our entertaining story starts with data on a single mobile device that spreads over multiple apps, users, devices, companies, tenants in our cloud backend, even data exchanged with agricultural machines. We report on security aspects, multi-tenancy, offline capability and synchronization, internationalization, and the different treatment of master data, job planning data, and high-frequency near-real-time data for the localization of vehicles in the field. All this is presented with a strong focus on data, elaborating step by step the challenges and our decisions in the system design.

Our audience will learn about many recurring architectural challenges and solution patterns around data in mobile app ecosystems, they will learn how recent patterns like Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) and many others helped us, and they will learn how technologically innovative today’s farming practices are.

Presenters
avatar for Susanne Braun

Susanne Braun

Fraunhofer IESE
Susanne Braun is a researcher in the area of scalable mobile software architectures at Fraunhofer IESE. She has a strong background as a developer and software architect. Susanne Braun has over five years of industry experience in software development projects and has worked for Deutsche Bahn, Deutsche Telekom, Deutsche Flugsicherung, and other organizations. At her former employer, Accso GmbH, she was responsible for setting up competence in the... Read More →
avatar for Ralf Carbon

Ralf Carbon

John Deere
Ralf Carbon is a software architect at John Deere. He is responsible for software architectures connecting agricultural machines, large-scale information systems, and business apps supporting agricultural stakeholders. Before joining John Deere, Carbon headed the research area Business Goes Mobile at Fraunhofer IESE and worked as a consultant and researcher for software architecture for many years. He holds an MS and a PhD in Computer Science... Read More →
avatar for Matthias Naab

Matthias Naab

Fraunhofer IESE
Matthias Naab is a software architect and works as a consultant and researcher for Fraunhofer IESE. He oversees the area of architecture for information systems and works with customers from many industries to build innovative products and modernize legacy systems. Naab regularly speaks at scientific and industrial conferences and teaches software architecture in the Fraunhofer academy. Before joining Fraunhofer IESE, he worked as a developer... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
3. Salon E

3:00pm

Office Hours: Software Architecture as Code; Software Architecture Boot Camp
Topic leaders facilitate open conversations about the sessions that they led.

Moderators
avatar for Simon Brown

Simon Brown

Coding the Architecture
Simon Brown is an independent consultant who helps organizations build better software by adopting a lightweight, pragmatic approach to software architecture. He is the creator of the C4 software architecture model and the author of Software Architecture for Developers, a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility. Simon regularly speaks at software development conferences around the... Read More →
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line architecture... Read More →
avatar for Robert Nord

Robert Nord

Robert Nord is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI), where he develops effective methods and practices for software architecture. He also leads research on strategies for scaling agile development by incorporating architecture practices. Before joining the SEI, he worked in industry, where he balanced research in software architecture with work in designing and evaluating large-scale... Read More →
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics, and agile development. Her recent research focuses on managing technical debt in large-scale, software-intensive... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
5. Salon B

3:00pm

Applying Ontologies to Software Architecture
Industries and organizations are building comprehensive ontologies of their domains to address a wide range of business problems such as enhanced search and discovery of structured and unstructured information assets, enforcing and demonstrating regulatory compliance, integrating applications, enforcing data standards, and managing data quality. This session explores the practicalities of building and maintaining complex ontologies and applying them to architect software solutions.

Moderators
avatar for Ian Maung

Ian Maung

Citi
Ian Maung is the Senior Vice President of Enterprise Data Management at Citi, where he leads the team responsible for Citi’s enterprise information model and ontology. Ian represents Citi at international standards bodies such as the EDM Council and the OMG. He has over a decade of enterprise software architecture experience spanning multiple domains and platforms. Formerly, Ian was an assistant professor of computer science at the... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

3:00pm

QA to AQ: Shifting from Quality Assurance to Agile Quality
As organizations transition to agile processes, quality assurance (QA) activities and roles need to evolve. Traditionally, QA activities occur late in the development process, after the software is fully functioning. As a consequence, QA departments have been "quality gatekeepers" rather than actively engaged in the ongoing development and delivery of quality software. Since agile teams incrementally deliver working software, this provides an opportunity to engage in QA activities much earlier, ensuring that both functionality and system qualities are addressed just in time. Agile teams embrace a "whole team" approach. Even though special skills may be required to perform certain development and QA tasks, everyone on the team is focused on the delivery of quality software.

Prioritizing and implementing necessary functionality keeps an agile project moving forward. However, it is also important to focus on system quality at the same time. Otherwise, qualities can get shoved aside or wistfully imagined as emerging along with the architecture. This session will show you how you can interject quality specification, design, and testing efforts into your project and be more agile about it. We will introduce agile techniques and patterns of practices that support the definition and delivery of system qualities. We will also discuss the role of QA and architects in agile teams and how they ensure that important qualities are addressed in an agile manner that emphasizes architecture capabilities such as usability, security, performance, scalability, internationalization, availability, and accessibility.

Wednesday April 29, 2015 3:00pm - 4:30pm
2. Salon D

3:30pm

Architecting Hybrid Cloud Solutions with Watson Developer Cloud
There is no question that cloud-based computing solutions can provide businesses with big value. IBM, Amazon, Microsoft, and Google all deliver cloud-based solutions that offer unique access to capabilities that on-premise solutions cannot provide. IT teams within the enterprise are constantly focusing on driving more of their solutions to the cloud, and there are really good reasons for doing so. However, certain enterprise solutions that favor an on-premise approach also present architectural constraints. How do you bring those cloud services capabilities into your on-premise solution? You go with a hybrid cloud environment.

In this presentation, we will describe the various hybrid cloud solutions that we created using the Watson cognitive services from IBM; share the architectural patterns, code, and tutorials on GitHub that we created; and discuss the pros and cons of the hybrid approach. We’ll also talk about the challenges that we encountered during our investigation.

By the end of the presentation, attendees will have the knowledge necessary to determine why they would want to take a hybrid approach to a cloud-based solution, the quality attributes to be concerned about, what architecture patterns could be used, and how they could use the samples on GitHub to deploy an actual integration of their own.

Presenters
avatar for Will Chaparro

Will Chaparro

IBM Watson Group
Will Chaparro is a development manager at The IBM Watson Group who has spent over 5 years designing and building complex enterprise search solutions for organizations. He also spent 11 years as a software engineer designing and implementing scalable audio-conferencing solutions for Compunetix, Inc. Will has spoken at many technical conferences, including SATURN 2014, where his presentation received the Architecture in Practice Presentation Award... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
3. Salon E

4:00pm

Does Your Cloud Solution Look Like a Mushroom?
This presentation draws from my recent blog post “Journey to Self Hosting” and many more resources for some high-level ideas about cloud solutions. I'll discuss what's good and what's not good about "The Cloud." I’ll provide an overview of the many security issues that entities need to think about when deciding whether to use the cloud or to build in-house infrastructure. Owning the technical expertise isn't always necessary. On the other hand, in-house solutions can provide finer grained customized solutions with potential for greater visibility and control than can cloud offerings that are more generic. I'll also discuss my personal journey and what I've discovered along the way, including how you can make the right decisions based on others’ experiences and learn from their mistakes rather than your own. 

Presenters
avatar for Kim Carter

Kim Carter

Architect. OWASP Chapter Leader, BinaryMist
Cyber-security, Architecture, Web Development, Mentoring, Network Engineering, Dev-ops

Wednesday April 29, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
3. Salon E

5:00pm

SATURN Battle Decks with Michael and George!
Unwind and have a little fun with your fellow SATURN attendees during this improvisational presentation game! Your hosts, Michael Keeling and George Fairbanks, have prepared a selection of random slide decks to be presented by brave volunteers. Fame and prizes await those who seize the day!

Rules:
  1. The presenter cannot see the slides before presenting.
  2. The presenter delivers each slide in succession without skipping slides or going back.
  3. The presentation ends when all slides are presented, or after 6 minutes (whichever comes first).

Sign-up sheets are available at the Information Table outside the General Session room (Salon C).

Presenters
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →

Wednesday April 29, 2015 5:00pm - 6:00pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

6:00pm

 
Thursday, April 30
 

7:30am

8:00am

Morning Beverages
Attendees staying within the SATURN hotel-room block receive a voucher good for breakfast each day of their stay in the hotel restaurant.

Thursday April 30, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
6. Refreshment Area

9:00am

Systems Characterization: An Approach to Modernizing Disparate Legacy Systems
The authors are engaged in long-term operations and maintenance of multiple large-scale systems with fluctuating operational requirements. To find the most cost-effective means to update and upgrade these systems, we used a systems architecture view to create a consistent method. The process stresses the importance and value of data-driven assessment of an as-is architecture to guide evolution of the to-be architecture. This process results in knowledge with supporting data that can be transferred to customers, including the U.S. government, to create substantiated purchase requests with measurable return on investment.

Presenters
avatar for Julie Kent

Julie Kent

Raytheon
Julie Kent has been working in systems integration for over 20 years. She moved to Raytheon 9 years ago and programmed a TENA interface for the Instrumentation System at the National Training Center (NTC). Julie worked on database upgrades and integration to support training exercises at the NTC, Joint Readiness Training Center, and Joint Multinational Readiness Center. She also integrated COTS products to create a management information system... Read More →
avatar for Jane Orsulak

Jane Orsulak

Raytheon
Jane Orsulak, Engineering Fellow, leads the Raytheon IIS Mission Analysis Capability Center (MACC), focusing on performing mission analysis and leveraging modeling and simulation tools. She is an Open Group Certified Master IT Architect. Prior to her work with the MACC, she worked as a system architect for unmanned systems ground control systems and was a key contributor to the NATO STANAG 4586 Unmanned Systems Interoperability Architecture... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
3. Salon E

9:00am

Exploiting Fast and Slow Thinking
As team leaders or architects, we can benefit from knowing more about how we think, deliberate, and decide. Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman, explains two systems that drive how we think. System 1 thinking is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slow, deliberate, and logical.

In this session, you will learn how fast and slow thinking affects your decision making. You’ll explore how common development practices, with an emphasis on agile practices, can amplify your thinking abilities and how they might lead you astray. For example, Given-When-Then behavior-driven development (BDD) scenarios are concrete and specific. They prevent us from leaping to conclusions about expected results. Those same BDD specs can also lead you to believe that’s all there is. The Pomodoro Technique helps block work into manageable chunks, making time for uninterrupted slow thinking. But what else might you do?

Fast thinking works well in familiar contexts. You save time when you don’t have to deliberate over details to make informed decisions. But fast thinking can lead to poor decisions. You might jump to conclusions, be wildly optimistic, or under-assess risks and rewards. You need to exploit both fast and slow thinking on agile projects. And you need to be aware of when fast thinking is tripping you up.

During this session, you will explore some impacts of fast and slow thinking and share where you might need to slow down or speed up. You will practice reframing questions about specific situations in terms of fast and slow thinking. And you’ll identify specific situations where your thinking needs to shift and explore how to make those shifts.

Presenters
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-­Brock Associates
Rebecca Wirfs-­Brock is an innovator in software architecture and design techniques and author of two popular object design books. Although best known as the creator of Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDD meme, she is also interested in simply expressing complex requirements and effectively designing software architecture. She is Director of the Agile Alliance's Experience Report Program and a co-founder of the Agile Open... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
2. Salon D

9:00am

Perspectives on the Modern Practice of Software Architecture

This session will combine the perspectives of three senior Googlers on what the modern practice of software architecture means for engineers and managers. Jack Greenfield (Senior Staff Software Engineer) will discuss how application modeling, cloud platforms, containers, and management technologies like Google's open source Kubernetes have changed the way we think about software and system architecture. Rick Buskens (Tech Lead/Manager) will reflect on approaches to evolving mission-critical "legacy" systems in large, complex organizations. Jeromy Carriere (Engineering Director) will talk about how managers, sometimes thought to be out of the technical loop, play an increasingly important role in architectural decision making. There will be plenty of time for Q&A.


Thursday April 30, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
1. Baltimore Theatre

9:30am

Enterprise Applications Health Improvement Program
An application’s stability and longevity must be strengthened and extended to support business continuity and agility without increasing the cost of IT and human capital. This presentation introduces a program called the Application Wellness Clinic that organizations can use to address this business concern. The clinic is owned and initiated by an architecture team, and collaboration is the key to its success. This presentation will describe the new method, its framework, and the set of tools and guidelines required to run the clinic.

For the Application Wellness Clinic, a few key parameters are selected to assess an application’s health. The clinic provides a 360° focus on the application and will make its health more transparent to business and senior management teams. Each application will have a different execution path based on its position in the development and sustainment life cycle, and each execution path will be unique in nature and duration. During the execution process, the clinic produces a quality attribute-level and application-level health index called the Enterprise Application Health Index (EAHI). At the end of the clinic, each application will have regular cycles for diagnosis and recovery.

Improving the health of the application to an acceptable level is the primary objective of the Application Wellness Clinic. The clinic will also develop time and cost estimations for improving and maintaining the application’s health. This clinic not only recovers the health of an application, it also helps reveal the level of operational efficiency in the business and reduce operational costs. 

Presenters
avatar for Eswaran Thandi

Eswaran Thandi

Eswaran Thandi is a principal architect who has more than 16 years of experience in the IT industry. He specializes in high-performance and cloud computing. His experience spans multiple business domains, including telecom, banking, and transportation. He has defined the process and frameworks to establish the Enterprise & Solution Architecture practice.

Thursday April 30, 2015 9:30am - 10:00am
3. Salon E

10:00am

Using Hazard Analysis to Make Early Architecture Decisions for an Autonomous Automotive Application
Developing a producible autonomous vehicle requires addressing functional safety compliance, an effort that can be considerable. The computer system has a much larger scope than does a traditional automotive system, and many of the functions are critical to avoiding hazardous events, which increases the design and development effort. Some architectural decisions must be made early in the design process and include issues of redundancy, system separation, and functionality limitations. These decisions could greatly influence the effort to achieve the required level of safety at a later stage, and an early analysis of their effects can help avoid unexpected compliance problems later.

We performed systems engineering tasks on a case of an autonomous hauler for quarry-type work sites. We defined system use cases, developed an overview functional architecture, and performed a preliminary hazard analysis for the intended application. Our proposed method combines common systems and safety engineering tasks that can be conducted early in the life cycle, and we illustrate how the outcome can be analyzed to inform early design decisions.

Issues of system partitioning and redundancy have a potentially high impact on the effort to achieve functional safety compliance, and some of those decisions are highly architectural and need addressing relatively early in a design process. Use cases, activity diagrams, and overview function block diagrams can be defined early and act as input to a preliminary hazard analysis, which in turn provides valuable input to early decisions about partitioning and redundancy.

Presenters
avatar for Joakim Fröberg

Joakim Fröberg

Mälardalen University
Joakim Fröberg is a senior researcher at Mälardalen University. He earned his PhD in Computer Science in 2007 on the topic of engineering automotive electronic systems and has 16 years of industry experience in developing software-intensive embedded systems. Joakim’s research interests include systems engineering of complex computer-based systems, especially methods for analysis and selection of system architecture and systems... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
3. Salon E

10:30am

Morning Break
Thursday April 30, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
6. Refreshment Area

11:00am

Agilizing the Architecture Department
The secret to making architecting agile is to change your view of the main deliverable. An agile software development team does not deliver a “big-bang system,” but a continuous stream of improvements to a system. In the same way, an agile architect does not deliver a “big up-front design,” but a continuous flow of architectural decisions, step by step gaining control of the uncertainties and risks surrounding complex IT solutions. This view of architecture is the basis of Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA), an approach that has been developed by CGI and has been proven to support solution architects globally in a lean and agile manner.

In this session, I will report our experiences implementing RCDA at a major European transportation infrastructure organization. We used RCDA’s principles and practices to help the organization’s architects reconnect with their colleagues who had “gone agile.” The experience shows how to transform an approval- and compliance-oriented architecture department into a collaborative team that helps projects create “just-enough architecture” in tight time frames and explain their priorities and choices to business stakeholders.

Presenters
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

CGI
Eltjo R. Poort is a Lead Expert on Solution Architecture at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the United States. In the last decade, he produced various publications on improving architecting practices, including his PhD thesis in 2012. Eltjo is best known... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
3. Salon E

11:00am

My Silver Toolbox
A few years ago, I started ending my presentations and workshops with the phrase “I hope that this is another tool you can put in your silver toolbox.” The idea of the “silver toolbox” comes from a 2009 quote from Mel Rosso-Llopart of Carnegie Mellon University: “I can’t give you a silver bullet, but I can give you a silver toolbox!” I doubt Mel even remembers saying this. It was in the middle of a random lecture during the TSPi course he teaches—but I do remember. And that simple phrase concisely describes my entire approach to adopting and teaching software engineering methods and practices.

When I travel on-site with a customer, I always bring a “coach’s bag”—a cheap Vivisimo handbag filled with various tools I nearly always need to facilitate workshops, enhance ad hoc design sessions, create documentation, or generally improve discussions. In my mind, I keep a tool kit of experiences—methods, bits of knowledge, nuggets of wisdom, strategies, and catch phrases.

These are the tools I have in my “Silver Toolbox.” What’s in yours? Join me along with Simon Brown, Will Chaparro, George Fairbanks, Ari Font, and Gail Harris as we explore some of the tools of the trade and learn what it takes to be a software architect.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Simon Brown

Simon Brown

Coding the Architecture
Simon Brown is an independent consultant who helps organizations build better software by adopting a lightweight, pragmatic approach to software architecture. He is the creator of the C4 software architecture model and the author of Software Architecture for Developers, a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility. Simon regularly speaks at software development conferences around the... Read More →
avatar for Will Chaparro

Will Chaparro

IBM Watson Group
Will Chaparro is a development manager at The IBM Watson Group who has spent over 5 years designing and building complex enterprise search solutions for organizations. He also spent 11 years as a software engineer designing and implementing scalable audio-conferencing solutions for Compunetix, Inc. Will has spoken at many technical conferences, including SATURN 2014, where his presentation received the Architecture in Practice Presentation Award... Read More →
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.
avatar for Gail E. Harris

Gail E. Harris

TVOntario
Gail Harris is the director and architect of web and mobile delivery at TVOntario (TVO), Ontario's public educational media organization. Gail oversees all technical and operational aspects of TVO's web and mobile presence, long-term technology strategy, development methods, and software practices. Before joining TVO, Gail was a principal and co-owner of Instantiated Software, a company that applied agile methodologies and open source... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
2. Salon D

11:00am

Programming in the 1960s: A Personal History
This talk is for those who would like to visit the computer museum but haven't yet had the time. I was hired as a programmer in 1964, and I’ll tell some stories about what life was like then for programmers. If you attend, you will learn
  • why it wasn't my fault
  • why the difference in size between an IBM 360/67 and a CDC 6600 mattered
  • what the IBM repairman did to warrant being treated as a terrorist
  • why hairstyles were much shorter in the ’70s than in the ’60s


Presenters
avatar for Len Bass

Len Bass

Len Bass was a Senior Principal Researcher at National ICT Australia Ltd. (NICTA). He joined NICTA in 2011 after 25 years at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He is the coauthor of two award-winning books in software architecture, Software Architecture in Practice and Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond, as well as several other books and numerous papers in computer science and software engineering. Len has more... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

11:00am

Understanding Quality Goals
Many developers have a shallow understanding of how to achieve quality goals such as safety, security, and availability. Even when architects have a deep understanding of this, developers’ lack of awareness can still endanger product quality. The challenge is to help developers achieve an understanding of quality attributes adequate for project needs. Quality Assumption Reviews help to meet this challenge. Their goal is to synchronize understanding of quality attributes, how they differ from functions, and how they "work" by making quality assumptions visible. When such reviews precede quality goal identification (e.g., QAWs), they make it more effective. They are tactics to address what should be a short-term understanding deficit.

A "quality champion," such as an architect, lists a set of basic assumptions about qualities and their achievement. The list is distributed to the project team prior to review. Assumption discussions prior to review should be encouraged. During the review, the team discusses various assumptions and asks questions. Participants identify problems with assumptions or their statements. Team member experience and understanding of quality goals determines which assumptions need discussion.

This session will model a review of a comprehensive set of quality assumptions. A strategy for demonstrating the subsequent degree of quality understanding will also be described.

Presenters
avatar for David Gelperin

David Gelperin

CTO, ClearSpecs Enterprises
David Gelperin is CTO of ClearSpecs Enterprises. He has more than 45 years’ experience in software development with an emphasis on software requirements, requirements risk management, and software quality, verification, and testing (SQVT). For the last 15 years, Dave has focused on understanding requirements, requirements management, and requirements risk management. Dave has been an SQVT coach and instructor, quality support manager... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
5. Salon B

11:30am

Maturing Agile Teams and Driving Quality Through Architecture Principles
The architect’s effectiveness to drive sound architectural decisions and reconcile tradeoffs that positively impact the quality of software solutions can be inhibited when development teams are immature and appropriate quality assurance process and tools are lacking. Teams that must adapt their agile software engineering approach to fit non-agile organizational structures and business contexts find this challenge particularly apparent.

This experience report shares insights and lessons learned from a yearlong effort to work with newly formed agile teams to standardize on quality assurance practices and tools across projects for a customer who is new to agile development. It presents a set of process, skill set, and infrastructure changes driven by architecture quality attributes that enabled our teams to become more productive and more effective in engaging with the customer. While challenges remain, our teams today are better equipped not only to map quality attributes such as performance and integrate-ability to specific development activities but also to manage and measure these attributes.

In presenting these lessons learned, we structure the talk into three sections. First, we briefly describe our business context and development environment for teams working directly on several customer solutions. We then provide details of the quality initiative that introduced new quality practices, infrastructure, and development skills to the teams, while highlighting several of the challenges we faced. Finally, we share insights and tactics, from an architect’s perspective, that can help with these challenges, particularly the ones related to agile, architecture, and driving quality attributes for a non-agile customer.

Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Software
Amine Chigani is an Industrial Internet architect at GE Software. His work focuses on building Predictivity™ solutions for Industrial Internet domains including aviation, transportation, energy, and health care. Amine is a founding member and contributor in the Industrial Internet Consortium's architecture working group. Prior to his current assignment, Amine was an architecture scientist at GE Global Research, a visiting scientist at the... Read More →
avatar for Yun Freund

Yun Freund

GE Software
Yun Freund is an executive director of software engineering at GE Software. After leading the Predix Services Platform, she now leads the Transportation Solutions Group to deliver a multigeneration product roadmap for GE Transportation's vision for the Industrial Internet. Yun also leads the simplification effort on Predix Platform productivity across GE Software. Prior to joining GE, Yun was a director of software and services at Cisco Systems... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
3. Salon E

12:00pm

Locating the Architectural Roots of Technical Debt
In our studies of many large-scale software systems, we have observed that defective files seldom exist alone. They are usually architecturally connected, and their architectural structures exhibit significant design flaws that propagate bugginess among files. We call these flawed structures the architecture roots, a type of technical debt that incurs high maintenance penalties. Removing the architecture roots of bugginess requires refactoring, but the benefits of refactoring have historically been difficult for architects to quantify or justify. In this talk, we present a case study of identifying and quantifying such architecture debts in a large-scale industrial software project. Our approach is to model and analyze software architecture as a set of design rule spaces (DRSpaces). Using data extracted from the project’s development artifacts, we were able to identify the files implicated in architecture flaws and suggest refactorings based on removing these flaws. Then we built economic models of the before and (predicted) after states, which gave the organization confidence that doing the refactorings made business sense, in terms of a handsome return on investment.

Presenters
avatar for Yuanfang Cai

Yuanfang Cai

Drexel University
Dr. Yuanfang Cai is an associate professor at Drexel University. She received her MS and PhD degrees in 2002 and 2006, respectively, from the University of Virginia. Dr. Cai’s research areas include software evolution, software modularity, software economics, and sociotechnical congruence. Her recent work focuses on detecting architecture issues that are the root cause of software defects. Dr. Cai has... Read More →
avatar for Volodymyr Fedak

Volodymyr Fedak

SoftServe, Inc.
Volodymyr Fedak is a Solution Architect at SoftServe. He has more than nine years of experience in software development and has successfully led complex projects with small and medium-sized teams, covering various aspects of software development, process, and methodology. He has worked on versatile projects, mainly Java and Ruby, with different application architectures. Additionally Volodymyr is experienced with video post-processing techniques... Read More →
avatar for Serge Haziyev

Serge Haziyev

SoftServe, Inc.
Serhiy Haziyev works as a VP of Software Architecture at SoftServe, Inc., a leading global outsourced product and application development company. Serhiy has an SEI Software Architecture Professional certificate and more than 15 years of experience in enterprise-level solutions including big data, SaaS/cloud, SOA, and carrier-grade telecommunication services. His current activities at SoftServe include leading, mentoring, and motivating the... Read More →
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Rick Kazman is a professor at the University of Hawaii and a research scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
3. Salon E

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday April 30, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
6. Refreshment Area

1:30pm

Making Better Architectural Choices with the Architecture Valuation Framework
In an era when generating business value is the principle consideration of what enterprise architecture (EA) does, many EA organizations face the challenge of demonstrating the value of a specific architecture choice. The challenge is further compounded by the fact that the value of architecture is often demonstrable only long after the architecture has been put in place. Even then, the ability to assign value to architecture—as opposed to a specific tool, process, or organizational change—is difficult. Departing from the "I told you so" approach for measuring the value of architecture, the Architecture Valuation Framework aims to quantify value of architecture choices at the time when those choices are being made. Expressed in business terms and echoing the concerns of cost, speed, and quality, the Architecture Valuation Framework is a technique that provides pertinent data, in the form of quantitative measures, to decision makers to aid in selecting an optimal architecture choice among alternatives.

This session discusses the structure of the framework; the approach to implementing it; and its applicability to the target architecture definition process, solution reviews, and the strategy definition.

Presenters
avatar for Voytek Janisz

Voytek Janisz

Progressive Insurance
Voytek Janisz is a senior enterprise architect at Progressive Insurance. Janisz is responsible for overall strategy of the evolution of the enterprise architecture practice at Progressive. He led initiatives to standardize the approach for describing enterprise architecture, establish architecture governance, and utilize architectural information across all IT disciplines. Janisz's background includes strategy development, systems engineering... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
3. Salon E

1:30pm

Office Hours: DevOps Essentials for Software Architects; Perspectives on the Modern Practice of Software Architecture
Topic leaders facilitate open conversations about the sessions that they led.

Moderators
avatar for Len Bass

Len Bass

Len Bass was a Senior Principal Researcher at National ICT Australia Ltd. (NICTA). He joined NICTA in 2011 after 25 years at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He is the coauthor of two award-winning books in software architecture, Software Architecture in Practice and Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond, as well as several other books and numerous papers in computer science and software engineering. Len has more... Read More →
avatar for Jeromy Carriere

Jeromy Carriere

Google
Jeromy is an engineering director at Google, leading teams that develop core components of Google’s production infrastructure. Before joining Google, Jeromy was chief architect for the X.commerce business unit at eBay, Inc., where he was technical lead for the design and development of an open-commerce platform, incorporating cloud, big data, and messaging technologies into a unified offering. Jeromy has held positions including senior... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
5. Salon B

1:30pm

Leading Change: Engaging Critical Stakeholders for Project Success
Software architects, development managers, and other technical managers are change leaders—they have a role to champion change in their organizations. Often technical leaders focus solely on building a great technical solution. In fact, what we know about organizational change is that adoption is based on a variety of factors, of which only one is the quality of the solution. And quality may not even be among the top reasons for change adoption! An essential skill in leading change is stakeholder engagement—identifying stakeholders (those individuals who can affect or be affected by your project), assessing stakeholder influence and support, and engaging your most critical stakeholders for maximum impact.

So how do you get started, and what are the tactics? In this 90-minute hands-on session, participants will use a one-page template to guide them through a three-step process for stakeholder engagement. In the course of completing their own stakeholder engagement plans for a project in which they are currently involved, participants will learn how to identify, assess, and engage stakeholders to increase the likelihood of technical change adoption. What are the major types of stakeholders? Which important stakeholders are often overlooked? Who already supports the change, and who needs to support the change? What are the various engagement strategies that can be employed? Who should engage which stakeholders? The one-page template is available electronically so participants can save their work and be ready to put their plans into action when they get back to the office.

Presenters
avatar for Marisa Sanchez

Marisa Sanchez

Independent Consultant, Marisa Sanchez
Marisa Sanchez, PhD, brings over 20 years of experience in organization development and change management. Her consulting approach uniquely focuses on achieving results by integrating deep knowledge and expertise in organization development, project management, and business strategy. She works effectively with executives and senior managers, project managers, and information technologists who appreciate her results-focused approach. Her niche... Read More →


Thursday April 30, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
2. Salon D

1:30pm

Taming Big Balls of Mud with Agile, Diligence, and Hard Work
Big Ball of Mud (BBoM) architectures are viewed as the culmination of many design decisions that, over time, result in a system that is a hodgepodge of steaming and smelly anti-patterns. It can be arguably claimed that one of the reasons for the growth and popularity of agile practices is partially because the state of the art of software architectures is not that good. Agile methods, with their focus on extensive testing and frequent integration, have been shown to make it easier to deal with evolving (possibly muddy) architectures and to keep systems working while making significant improvements and adding functionality. Time has also shown that agile practices are not sufficient to prevent or eliminate Mud.

This session will examine the paradoxes that underlie BBoMs, what causes them, and why they are so prominent. I’ll also explain why continuous delivery and test-driven development with refactoring are not enough to ensure clean architecture. Additionally, I’ll talk about some practices and patterns that help keep the code clean. Some of these include Testing, Divide & Conquer, Gentrification, Demolition, Quarantine, Refactoring, Craftmanship, and the like. The original BBoM paper described some best practices such as Shearing Layers and Sweeping It Under the Rug as ways to help deal with muddy architectures. Additionally, other practices such as Paving over the Wagon Trail and Wiping Your Feet at the Door can make code more habitable.

Presenters
avatar for Joseph Yoder

Joseph Yoder

The Refactory, Inc.
Joseph Yoder is an agilist, computer scientist, object-oriented technologist, international speaker, and pattern author. Joe serves as president of the board of The Hillside Group, a group dedicated to improving the quality of software development. He is coauthor of the Big Ball of Mud pattern, which illuminates many fallacies in software architecture. Joe teaches and mentors developers on agile methods, design, patterns, refactoring, and... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
1. Baltimore Theatre

2:00pm

The Architectural Analysis for Security (AAFS) Method
Security is a quality attribute that has both architectural and coding implications—it is necessary to get both right to create and maintain secure systems. But most of the existing research on making systems secure has focused on coding, and there is little direction or insight into how to create a secure architecture. In this talk we propose several ways to analyze and evaluate the security readiness of an architecture: vulnerability-based (VoAA), tactics-based (ToAA), and pattern-based architectural analysis (PoAA) techniques. We first compare the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. Next, we show that these different approaches are complementary to each other. Finally, we describe how to combine these analysis techniques in a single analysis method to obtain the best outcomes. We employ our blended analysis technique in a case study to demonstrate the feasibility of our architectural-security analysis method.

Presenters
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Rick Kazman is a professor at the University of Hawaii and a research scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies... Read More →
avatar for Jungwoo Ryoo

Jungwoo Ryoo

Pennsylvania State University
Jungwoo Ryoo is an associate professor and chair of the Information Sciences and Technology (IST) Department at the Pennsylvania State University–Altoona. Ryoo is also a graduate and affiliated faculty member of the college of IST. He is a technical editor for IEEE Communications Magazine and works with IEEE as a consultant. His research interests include information security and assurance, software engineering, and computer networking... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
3. Salon E

2:30pm

When and Where to Apply the Family of Architecture-Centric Methods
In this presentation, we discuss architecture-centric methods that have been developed and used with DoD, federal, and commercial customers. The architecture-centric methods include the Quality Attribute Workshop (QAW), Mission Thread Workshop (MTW), Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM), System ATAM, and System of Systems (SoS) Architecture Evaluation. The conceptual flow of each method with its inputs and outputs is presented to provide a foundation for the participants. We demonstrate how the methods are used to support requirements elicitation, evaluate architectures, and identify potential risks. The methods, especially when used together, provide lightweight, flexible processes to address systems, SoS, and software architectures. We discuss examples that show how the methods have been combined and where variations can be made to support different situations. Applying these methods early in a program’s life cycle to clarify requirements and identify potential risks enables the program to address and mitigate potential issues before finalizing designs.

Presenters
avatar for Mike Gagliardi

Mike Gagliardi

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Mike Gagliardi is a principal engineer at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He has a Master of Science in Computer Science. |
avatar for Tim Morrow

Tim Morrow

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Tim Morrow is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in the Software Solutions Division. He develops and implements architecture-centric approaches to support the acquisition, development, and analysis of SoS, system, and software architectures for DoD and non-DoD programs. Before joining the SEI, he was a hardware diagnostic manager at Marconi Communications, a... Read More →
avatar for Bill Wood

Bill Wood

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Bill Wood has worked at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute for the last 25 years and has performed a combination of research activities and customer-interactive activities. He currently works in the Software Solutions Division, focusing on developing and implementing methods that can be used to expose risks in a system or system-of-systems architecture. The evaluation methods are based on the Architecture Tradeoff... Read More →

Thursday April 30, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
3. Salon E

3:00pm

3:30pm

Keynote: Rethinking Architecture in the Context of DevOps

Current approaches to software delivery require that we think differently about architecture. Old approaches emphasized consistency and standardization, well-considered interactions between components and systems across the enterprise, and centralized control to avoid inefficiencies that would result if different system teams made decisions independently. Increasingly, enterprises are seen as complex adaptive systems in which centralized “omniscient” control is ineffective. New delivery techniques like DevOps, with a focus on lean and agile processes, are a poor fit with the classic architecture approach. By removing stage-gate reviews and trying hard to reduce cycle time, such approaches make it difficult to impose architectural standards on individual projects.

I suggest that we re-think architecture in light of agile and DevOps approaches. At USCIS, we are experimenting with ways of doing this by moving toward more loosely coupled architectures to allow more flexibility at each endpoint. We encourage collaboration across teams on architectural questions so that we can ensure that architectural decisions support all systems with their differing needs without imposing external constraints. We created a team called Architecture and Design Services whose role is to support teams as they evolve architectures, doing research, pilots, reference implementations, and so on. The Architecture and Design Services team exerts subtle standardization control by advising teams on other enterprise needs that they should factor into their designs. These are all intended, in agile spirit, as experiments – we will see what works and try to evolve our new approach to architecture.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Schwartz

Mark Schwartz

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Mark Schwartz is the Chief Information Officer (CIO) of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), a component of the Department of Homeland Security. He works to increase the IT organization’s responsiveness to mission needs by reducing time from concept to deployment for new capabilities. To support this goal, Mr. Schwartz has introduced such practices as agile and lean development, continuous delivery, and DevOps. He also leads... Read More →


Thursday April 30, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
4. Salon C: General Sessions

4:30pm

6:00pm

Networking Happy Hour
Thursday April 30, 2015 6:00pm - 8:00pm
TBA